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September 1935

PALPEBROMANDIBULAR SYNKINESIS IN A PATIENT WITH ACUTE POLYNEURITIS AND FACIAL DIPLEGIA

Author Affiliations

Philadelphia

From the neurologic service of Dr. A. M. Ornsteen at the Philadelphia General Hospital.

Arch NeurPsych. 1935;34(3):625-630. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1935.02250210146011
Abstract

In a case of acute polyneuritis with facial diplegia a peculiar abnormal involuntary associated movement was observed between the paralyzed orbicularis oculi muscles and the mandible. Each voluntary and involuntary movement of the eyelids was synchronously associated with an involuntary short, sharp movement of the jaw upward and forward, and if the mouth was held open the jaw would snap shut with a click of the teeth. The phenomenon was not reversible; i. e., movement of the mandible did not cause involuntary associated movement of the eyelids. This abnormal associated movement did not exist before the present illness, and it has since disappeared with the return of voluntary power to the face. The name palpebromandibular synkinesis is used to differentiate the phenomenon from "jaw-winking," which is known as the Marcus Gunn phenomenon. I have been unable to find a reference to a similar observation in the literature.

REPORT OF CASE 

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