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April 1936

MENTAL CHANGES FOLLOWING HEAD TRAUMA IN CHILDREN

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Psychiatric Division of the Bellevue Hospital, New York.

Arch NeurPsych. 1936;35(4):723-769. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1936.02260040031003
Abstract

Mental disease in relation to head injury has engaged the interest of neuropsychiatrists for many years. The first references to this condition in modern literature are found in the writings of Esquirol1 (1837), in France, Prichard2 (1837), in the United States, Schlager3 (1857), in Austria, and Skae4 (1866), in Scotland. Since then an extensive literature has appeared, to which von Krafft-Ebing5 (1868), Hartmann6 (1884), Guder7 (1886), Bailey8 (1903), Meyer9 (1903), Trömner10 (1910), Berger11 (1915), Hadley12 (1922), Pfeifer13 (1928), Strauss and Savitsky14 (1934) and Schilder15 (1934) have contributed.

At first, the primary problem was nosologic. It was soon recognized that a certain group of these mental changes bore only an indirect relationship to the trauma which acted as a precipitant on a preexisting psychopathic personality, rather than as a direct etiologic agent. These mental conditions were

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