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July 1936

SUICIDE AND MENTAL DISEASEA CLINICAL ANALYSIS OF ONE HUNDRED CASES

Author Affiliations

WHITE PLAINS, N. Y.

Arch NeurPsych. 1936;36(1):1-12. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1936.02260070009001
Abstract

Suicide occurs in a great variety of settings, and to the psychiatrist who deals with personality disorders daily it is a serious practical problem. The generally accepted principle that all depressions are potentially suicidal is a simplification that has little value unless it is associated with a deeper analysis of the patient's life situation. The underlying factors are individual but, complex as these may be, it is reasonable to assume that some common determinants exist in such a universal phenomenon. Study of persons suffering from mental disease should help in this evaluation.

The present discussion consists of a general review of the clinical records of one hundred patients who have committed suicide. The group comprises sixty-one men and thirty-nine women. The study includes a diagnostic enumeration, a correlation of the intensity of the desire for suicide with the type of psychosis, some reference to the methods used and an analysis

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