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July 1936

SUBDURAL TRACTION AND POSTTRAUMATIC HEADACHESTUDY OF PATHOLOGY AND THERAPEUSIS

Author Affiliations

MONTREAL, CANADA

From the Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, the McGill University Faculty of Medicine, and the Montreal Neurological Institute.

Arch NeurPsych. 1936;36(1):75-95. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1936.02260070083007
Abstract

One of the most frequent sequelae to injury of the head is posttraumatic headache. Sufferers from this complaint all too often wander from doctor to doctor, from clinic to clinic and, alas! from lawyer to lawyer under the unjust suspicion of being neurotic or malingering. Posttraumatic headache associated with dizziness forms a clinical entity which is described by these patients in altogether typical fashion. The patient's description of his symptoms makes the diagnosis certain and allows the understanding physician to recognize the true sufferer and to distinguish him from the neurotic patient and the malingerer.

In 1927 this condition was described as a disease entity by one of us (W. P.).1 The fact that the procedure of treatment resulted in relief of symptoms in each of the reported cases was the final proof that the syndrome was a true one and that the underlying pathologic change, whatever it might

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