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August 1936

QUININE: AN EFFECTIVE FORM OF TREATMENT FOR MYOTONIAPreliminary Report of Four Cases

Author Affiliations

New York

From the Department of Neurology, service of Dr. Foster Kennedy, Chief of Staff.

Arch NeurPsych. 1936;36(2):382-383. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1936.02260080154011
Abstract

I shall give a brief report of the effectiveness of quinine in the treatment of myotonia, a condition hitherto almost entirely uninfluenced by any mode of therapy. Thus far, four patients have been given quinine, with resultant relief from myotonic disturbances. Rarely does a remnant of myotonia appear after adequate dosage.

REPORT OF CASES 

Case 1.  —J. D., an Italian aged 33, was admitted to the Bellevue Hospital on Nov. 1, 1935, complaining of "inability to get started quickly in any movement" which had been present since the age of 7 years. He described an initial weakness in any voluntary movement, accompanied by prolonged contraction and retarded relaxation, an "intention rigidity," which was aggravated by fatigue, emotion and cold and was relieved somewhat by heat or by a hot bath. The condition was worse in winter and better in summer. Occasionally he suffered from double vision.Physical examination revealed large,

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