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February 1937

NEUROLOGIC MANIFESTATIONS IN VITAMIN G (B2) DEFICIENCYAN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY IN DOGS

Author Affiliations

NEW HAVEN, CONN.

From the Departments of Pathology, Physiological Chemistry and Internal Medicine, the Yale University School of Medicine.

Arch NeurPsych. 1937;37(2):286-306. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1937.02260140072004
Abstract

A vast amount of experimental work has been done in the attempt to elucidate the rôle of dietary deficiencies in nervous disorders. No attempt will be made in this paper to review adequately the many important contributions in this field. However, no paper dealing with this subject can neglect mention of Eijkman,1 who in 1897 first described noninflammatory atrophic degeneration of the medullary sheaths of the peripheral nerves in hens fed polished rice. Since Eijkman's day, knowledge of deficiency diseases in general and of vitamin deficiencies in particular has been greatly advanced. It is now believed that there are at least three vitamin factors, in addition to other principles, which are essential for maintenance of the health of the nervous system. From the experimental standpoint, lesions in the nervous system have been produced through the absence of (a) the fat-soluble vitamin A, the precursor of which is carotene, (b

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