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April 1937

CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PHYSIOLOGY OF THE CONDITIONED REFLEX

Author Affiliations

BALTIMORE

From the Phipps Psychiatric Clinic, the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

Arch NeurPsych. 1937;37(4):848-858. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1937.02260160148014
Abstract

DEDICATION  It is a joy and a privilege to be one of those participating in the Seventy Year Jubilee for Adolf Meyer. This article is proffered with a full sense of its shortcomings as a positive contribution to the psychobiology for which he stands. The choice of this limited material was based on the fact that it represents a group of completed and related experiments. The laboratory from which these data are reported owes its origin to Dr. Meyer; it is therefore fitting and with a deep sense of personal gratitude for his encouragement and guiding criticisms that this survey of completed work is dedicated to him.

HISTORICAL REVIEW  As early as 500 B. C. Pythagoras spoke of the brain as the central organ of the higher forms of activity, a view upheld by Hippocrates and Galen but denied by Aristotle. About the beginning of the nineteenth century the attention

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