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June 1937

AGENESIS OF THE CORPUS CALLOSUMITS RECOGNITION BY VENTRICULOGRAPHY

Author Affiliations

IOWA CITY; MONTREAL, CANADA

From the Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery of McGill University and the Montreal Neurological Institute.

Arch NeurPsych. 1937;37(6):1251-1270. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1937.02260180031002
Abstract

Agenesis of the corpus callosum, both partial and complete, has been reported repeatedly as an unexpected autopsy observation. The five cases described in this communication are the first to be recognized during life, but the ventriculograms when once seen and understood could scarcely be mistaken for those showing any other condition. It is anticipated, therefore, that when clinicians generally recognize the ventriculographic features of these cases, the condition may be found to be less rare than is supposed and further knowledge of the function of the corpus callosum may be forthcoming.

Up to the year 1933, Baker and Graves1 could find only eighty-two cases of this condition reported in the medical literature, although the first example was described as long ago as 1812, by Reil.2 A brief analysis of the normal and abnormal development of the corpus callosum and a discussion of published views on its function are

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