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June 1937

GANGLIOGLIONEUROMA OF THE SPINAL CORD ASSOCIATED WITH PSEUDOSYRINGOMYELIAA HISTOLOGIC STUDY

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO

From the Pathologic Laboratories (Dr. R. H. Jaffé, Director) of the Cook County Hospital, and the Division of Neuropathology (Dr. G. B. Hassin) of the University of Illinois College of Medicine.

Arch NeurPsych. 1937;37(6):1356-1370. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1937.02260180136009
Abstract

Of the intramedullary tumors of the spinal cord, true neuroma, consisting of ganglion cells, glia cells and large numbers of nerve fibers, is rare. Though common in the sympathetic nervous system, this tumor is rare in the cerebrospinal nerves, the spinal ganglia and the brain itself. Only one instance was reported by Foerster1 in which such a tumor was restricted to the spinal cord. In two other cases the tumor extended from the medulla into the upper cervical portion of the spinal cord, reaching the second segment, in the case reported by Pick and Bielschowsky,2 and the third segment, in that recorded by Foerster and Gagel.3 Unfortunately, this tumor has been described under a variety of names, such as ganglionic neuroma, neuroglioma, ganglionic glioma, neuroganglioma and ganglioglioneuroma. The most commonly used term, ganglioneuroma, is inaccurate, in that it names only one of the cellular constituents of this

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