[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Other
July 1937

AGGRESSION AND ANXIETY IN THE DETERMINATION AND NATURE OF MANIC ATTACKS

Author Affiliations

WAVERLEY, MASS.

From the McLean Hospital.

Arch NeurPsych. 1937;38(1):71-89. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1937.02260190081006
Abstract

THE MANIC ATTACK AS A REACTION  The psychiatric literature on mania, considered from a clinicodynamic point of view, has had little new to offer since the time of Kraepelin. It is as if his formulations represented the final word. The main ideas, so well expressed in Kretschmer's work,1 rest on simple observations and give ready explanations to the manic-depressive phenomena. They concern heredity and constitution and the cyclothymic temperament. This temperament has an inherent tendency to alternate between elation with expansiveness and depression with slowing down. Such alternations may, either for physiologic reasons or because of situational factors, become so pronounced that they incapacitate the patient socially for a certain length of time, which is also assumed to be more or less predetermined.While in the case of depression transitions between the "psychoneurotic" depressive and the manic-depressive syndrome have always been recognized, the manic attack has been regarded as

×