[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Other
October 1937

MENINGIOMASORIGIN, DIVERGENCE IN STRUCTURE AND RELATIONSHIP TO CONTIGUOUS TISSUES IN LIGHT OF PHYLOGENESIS AND ONTOGENESIS OF THE MENINGES, WITH SUGGESTION OF A SIMPLIFIED CLASSIFICATION OF MENINGEAL NEOPLASMS

Author Affiliations

Associate Neurologist and Associate Neuropathologist, the Mount Sinai Hospital NEW YORK

From the Division of Laboratories, the Mount Sinai Hospital.

Arch NeurPsych. 1937;38(4):667-712. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1937.02260220011001
Abstract

The probable origin and true histologic character of the meningioma, a tumor best known as dural endothelioma, are fairly old problems. A century ago, Cruveilhier1 (1835) intimated the meningeal origin of such tumors by naming them "cancerous growths of the meninges." He substituted this name for the older term "fungus growth of the dura," used by earlier writers. Since then, almost each decade has brought to the foreground important contributions on this subject, embodying observations and conclusions of some outstanding anatomist, pathologist or neurosurgeon. At first sight it would seem that these studies have resulted in little more than the creation of a large assortment of names, which include such terms as cylindroma, of Billroth;2 psammoma and dural sarcoma, of Virchow;3 epithelial cancer, of Bennett;4 fibroplastic tumor, of Lebert;5 epithelioma, of Bouchard6 and Robin;7 endothelioma, of Golgi;8 cancer of the arachnoid, of

×