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October 1937

ASSOCIATION OF CAROTID SINUS REFLEXES WITH SYNCOPE AND CONVULSIONSREPORT OF FOUR CASES

Author Affiliations

Resident in Medicine, the Cook County Hospital; Attending Physician, the Cook County Hospital CHICAGO

Arch NeurPsych. 1937;38(4):761-774. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1937.02260220105006
Abstract

Since the work of Hering in 1923 on the reflex control of the heart rate and the vasomotor system, there has arisen a new interest in a subject which has occupied clinicians for many years. In 1799 Parry,1 in the course of a study on angina pectoris, noted that pressure on the neck slows the rate of the heart. Czermak2 in 1866 observed in himself that pressure on an expansile body at the upper border of the sternocleidomastoid muscle resulted in retardation of the pulse. He thought that this effect was due to mechanical excitation of the vagus nerve. For many years clinicians accepted this explanation, even though a great deal of experimental work tended to disprove Czermak's conception. Pagano3 in 1900 conducted experiments to show that the changes in the heart rate and vasomotor tonus produced by arterial hypotension or hypertension in the cerebral circulation are

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