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June 1938

CONVULSIONS PRODUCED BY ELECTRICAL STIMULATION OF THE CEREBRAL CORTEX OF UNANESTHETIZED CATS

Author Affiliations

NASHVILLE, TENN.

From the Department of Anatomy, the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine.

Arch NeurPsych. 1938;39(6):1213-1227. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1938.02270060103004
Abstract

The production of convulsions in animals has been accomplished in several ways. Dandy and Elman,1 in discussing experimental production of convulsions, listed six methods, most of which have been used extensively in experiments of this kind. One of these methods, electrical stimulation of the nervous system, has had perhaps a less extensive use than the others. Various investigators, however, have stimulated the cortex of different animals for the specific purpose of producing convulsive seizures. The earliest of these were Fritsch and Hitzig,2 who used a galvanic current, and Ferrier,3 who faradized the cortex of dogs, cats and rabbits. Since then, the production of convulsions in various animals by electrical stimulation of the cortex has been reported sporadically (Munk4 and Sherrington,5 in monkeys; Coombs6 and Gibbs and Gibbs,7 in cats; Tower and Hines,8 in cats and monkeys, and others). Recently Chaffee and Light

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