[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Other
July 1938

A METHOD OF TESTING CORTICAL FUNCTION AND SENSITIVITY OF THE SKINAN AID IN DIFFERENTIATING ORGANOGENIC AND PSYCHOGENIC DISTURBANCES

Author Affiliations

BALTIMORE

From the Phipps Psychiatric Clinic, Johns Hopkins University.

Arch NeurPsych. 1938;40(1):79-85. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1938.02270070089007
Abstract

Every living organism, by virtue of its biologic structure, reacts to certain stimuli from within and without. In the course of its development as an individual, the organism tends to fit the contours of its environment, i. e., to adapt. One can see this process in the infant as (through the developing nervous system) he meets his environment for the first time and in the adult when he encounters a new situation. This fitting into the milieu, or adaptation, seems to be a property of all living organisms. As one passes from lower to higher forms of life, the adaptation of the organism as a whole is carried out by successively more highly differentiated and specialized tissues, until in the highest vertebrates adaptation is accomplished chiefly by the cerebral cortex.

In the process of adaptation the organism begins to react to substitutes, or signals, for stimuli having congenital connections—to natural

×