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July 1938

METABOLIC STUDIES DURING INSULIN HYPOGLYCEMIA THERAPY OF THE PSYCHOSES

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Departments of Internal Medicine and Clinical Psychiatry, the New York State Psychiatric Institute and Hospital.

Arch NeurPsych. 1938;40(1):116-124. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1938.02270070126009
Abstract

Dextrose has been considered by many investigators as the normal fuel for brain oxidation. It perhaps should be pointed out, however, that this is not the only substance which brain tissue can and does oxidize and that it is probable that there is more than one pathway for oxidation of carbohydrates.1

Since the discovery of insulin numerous articles have appeared describing various disturbances in the function of the central nervous system accompanying the production of hypoglycemia by injection of insulin.2 These disturbances are usually readily relieved by the administration of dextrose. Dameshek and Myerson,3 in 1935, and, recently, Himwich and his co-workers4 have shown that the utilization of oxygen and dextrose by the brain is apparently markedly reduced during the hypoglycemic state. The latter investigators, in a recent article,4 suggested that this reduction in oxidation and utilization of dextrose by the brain is the basis

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