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March 1939

PATHOLOGIC PICTURE OF THUJONE AND MONOBROMATED CAMPHOR CONVULSIONSCOMPARISON WITH PATHOLOGIC PICTURE OF HUMAN EPILEPSY

Author Affiliations

NEW HAVEN, CONN.

From the Department of Pathology, Yale University School of Medicine.

Arch NeurPsych. 1939;41(3):460-470. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1939.02270150034002
Abstract

In the attempt to throw light on the pathogenesis and therapeusis of epilepsy the use of convulsant drugs in animal experimentation has been extensive. Chief among the convulsants employed have been some forms of absinth and monobromated camphor, their preference being based mainly on the close resemblance of the artificially provoked attack to the genuine one observed in man. Experimental data have been preeminently pharmacologic,1 biochemical2 and neurophysiologic.3 Pathologic changes in the central nervous system have been observed in epileptic patients, but the possibility of changes occurring as the result of convulsions produced in animals has not been thoroughly investigated. The present study was undertaken to explore this possibility. It was hoped that if lesions of the nervous system did occur they could be correlated with the lesions commonly described in human disease. With the exception of the work of Surabaschwili4 on the histologic substratum of

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