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May 1939

HISTOPATHOLOGIC CHANGES IN THE NERVOUS SYSTEM IN CASES OF PEPTIC ULCER

Author Affiliations

CINCINNATI

From the Department of Anatomy (Neurology), the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, and the medical services of the Cincinnati General Hospital and the Hamilton County Home and Chronic Disease Hospital.

Arch NeurPsych. 1939;41(5):871-912. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1939.02270170009001
Abstract

The relationship of the nervous system to peptic ulcer has been studied heretofore primarily with reference to the question of factors existing in the nervous system which play a specific role in production of the ulcer. The forceful reopening of the question of the neurogenic origin of peptic ulcer by the Balfour Lecture of Cushing,1 as well as subsequent reports, such as those by Grant,2 and Masten and Bunts,3 makes it clear that lesions in certain areas of the central nervous system may be directly related to the production of ulcer by pathologic alteration of visceral centers and pathways. In the present inquiry it was soon learned that the nervous system may take part in the total clinical picture which constitutes the syndrome of peptic ulcer in other ways than that of causation. It seemed probable that the nervous system must also be looked on as the

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