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June 1939

ETIOLOGIC FACTORS IN EXPERIMENTALLY PRODUCED PONTILE HEMORRHAGES

Author Affiliations

DURHAM, N. C.

From the Department of Pathology, Duke University School of Medicine.

Arch NeurPsych. 1939;41(6):1146-1152. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1939.02270180074007
Abstract

The association of pontile hemorrhages with space-consuming intracranial lesions has been frequently noted. Attwater,1 in 1911, studied 67 cases of traumatic and apoplectic hemorrhages and observed that in 30 per cent they were accompanied by pontile lesions. In 1917, Greenacre2 found multiple nontraumatic cerebral hemorrhages in the region of the basal ganglia and in the pons in 8.5 per cent of 128 cases. Wilson and Winkelman,3 in 1926, studied 129 cases of various space-consuming intracranial lesions and observed accompanying pontile lesions in 9.9 per cent. Rosenhagen4 observed tegmental and pontile hemorrhages in 10 of 19 cases of tumors of the brain which he studied. Moore and Stern5 demonstrated hemorrhage into the pons in 9.3 per cent of cases of varying lesions associated with increased intracranial pressure.

An attempt to explain the pathogenesis of this type of lesion has resulted in many hypotheses. Attwater1 suggested

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