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July 1939

EFFECT OF BENZEDRINE SULFATE IN TREATMENT OF PSYCHOSIS WITH POSTENCEPHALITIC PARKINSONISM

Author Affiliations

Secaucus, N. J. Clinical Director, Hudson County Hospital for Mental Diseases

Arch NeurPsych. 1939;42(1):112-120. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1939.02270190120007
Abstract

During the last few years considerable study has been made of the clinical effect of benzedrine sulfate in various physiologic and pathologic conditions.1 Benzedrine sulfate, a sympathomimetic drug, has lately been advocated for use in the treatment of postencephalitic parkinsonism.

In the past it had been routine practice at the Hudson County Hospital to treat patients suffering from psychosis with chronic encephalitis by means of large doses of atropine sulfate or scopolamine hydrobromide. Atropine sulfate was given in increasing doses, starting with 1 drop of a 0.5 per cent solution three times a day, as suggested by Stemplinger2 and others,3 and increasing the dose gradually to 12 or 15 drops three times a day, according to individual tolerance. Scopolamine hydrobromide was prescribed in doses of 1/100 grain (0.6 mg.) three times a day.

In deciding to give benzedrine a trial, we were particularly interested to learn: (1)

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