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September 1939

RECOVERY OF SYMPATHETIC NERVE FUNCTION IN SKIN TRANSPLANTS

Author Affiliations

CHARLESTON, S. C.; CHICAGO

From the Department of Surgery, the University of Chicago.

Arch NeurPsych. 1939;42(3):403-412. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1939.02270210041003
Abstract

The restoration of sympathetic function to the skin and other tissues peripherally denervated has not been studied extensively. The increasing use of sympathectomy makes important a more precise knowledge concerning sympathetic nerve regeneration in man after various types of denervation.

Forty years ago Tuckett1 and, later, Kilvington and Osborne2 found evidence of regeneration after section of postganglionic fibers. Boeke and Heringa3 observed sympathetic fibers along the ducts of the sweat glands and in close relation to the gland cells nine months after peripheral nerve section in man. Clark, Clark and Williams4 noted regeneration of sympathetic fibers and restoration of contractility to arterioles in the rabbit's ear, as viewed through their transparent chamber. Goecke and Beaufays5 showed an early growth of sympathetic fibers into transplanted ovaries in mice. Ford and Woodhall6 cited the syndrome of crocodile tears and the auriculotemporal syndrome as evidence of misdirection

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