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November 1939

HEMORRHAGES INTO THE CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM FOLLOWING LUMBAR SPINAL PUNCTURE

Author Affiliations

Catonsville, Md.

From the Neurological Laboratory, the Henry Phipps Psychiatric Clinic, and the Spring Grove State Hospital, Catonsville, Md.

Arch NeurPsych. 1939;42(5):903-911. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1939.02270230125010
Abstract

In reviewing the literature on hemorrhages into the central nervous system following lumbar spinal puncture, I was amazed by the paucity of cases reported, and felt somewhat like Schube and Raskin,1 who, after a review of the literature on the subject in 1936, remarked:

The rarer a disease, the greater is the interest in it and the less rare it becomes —due to the fact that more vigorous attempts are made to unearth cases of it. On the other hand, the rarer the unfortunate accidents accompanying a valuable and therapeutic procedure such, for instance, as the lumbar spinal puncture, the less apparent is the interest which the accidents arouse, so that practically no cases are unearthed and no attempts are made to study those which are. If one may judge the frequency with which spontaneous cerebral hemorrhage is a sequel of the lumbar spinal puncture by the number of

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