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December 1939

CEREBRAL CALCIFICATION IN A CASE OF CHRONIC PROGRESSIVE CHOREA

Author Affiliations

San Francisco

From the Laboratory of Neuropathology of the New York State Psychiatric Institute and Hospital, New York.

Arch NeurPsych. 1939;42(6):1128-1134. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1939.02270240166011
Abstract

Pathologic infiltration of calcium in the central nervous system is not easily recognized symptomatically. The clinical picture ranges from absence of signs during life, with infiltration as an observation at autopsy, to milder symptoms of headache, dizziness and vomiting and to grand and petit mal attacks, which Geyelin and Penfield1 called "cerebral calcification epilepsy," related to "endarteritis calcificans cerebri." Symptoms in which psychiatrists are particularly interested are the organic psychoses associated with such a pathologic process.

The problem of diagnosis in these cases is well demonstrated in the reports of Holschewnekoff,2 Mallory,3 Hansemann,4 Bassoe and Hassin,5 Lisa and Hirschhorn,6 Pick,7 Simon8 and Jervis.9

The case of cerebral calcification reported here has both clinical and pathologic importance. Clinically, the case was repeatedly diagnosed as one of Huntington's chorea with psychosis. Pathologically, the changes were those fundamental in chronic progressive chorea, with additional

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