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March 1940

EXPERIMENTAL EVIDENCE OF ANTICONVULSANT PROPERTIES OF SODIUM DIPHENYL HYDANTOINATE (DILANTIN SODIUM N. N. R.)

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO

From the Chicago State Hospital, Edward F. Dombrowski, M.D., Managing Officer.

Arch NeurPsych. 1940;43(3):453-455. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1940.02280030027002
Abstract

Putnam and Merritt,1 in a study of various anticonvulsant drugs, concluded that sodium diphenyl hydantoinate is a highly effective anticonvulsant which compares favorably with phenobarbital and is far superior to bromides. They administered various drugs having possibilities as anticonvulsant agents and then applied electrical stimulation of sufficient strength to produce convulsions. The work of Merritt, Putnam and Schwab1b was done exclusively on animals, the cat being used as the experimental test animal. It was found that animals have a characteristic threshold, with variations of less than 10 per cent for any one day. Merritt and Putnam1c expanded their study to the use of sodium diphenyl hydantoinate as a drug for the treatment of epilepsy and found that 58 per cent of their patients were completely relieved from attacks for a considerable period.

The authors felt that additional evidence of raising of the convulsive threshold in human subjects

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