[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Other
June 1940

CRANIOPHARYNGIOMA IN THE THIRD VENTRICLE OF THE BRAINPartial Surgical Removal and Pathologic Study

Author Affiliations

Chicago

From the Department of Neurology and Neurological Surgery, University of Illinois College of Medicine.

Arch NeurPsych. 1940;43(6):1195-1204. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1940.02280060140009
Abstract

Calcified "flakelike" shadows seen roentgenologically in the suprasellar region have long been recognized as almost positive evidence of the presence of a craniopharyngioma. The lesion arises from the unobliterated portion of the fetal craniopharyngeal duct and usually appears in the form of a cystic tumor. These tumors have been variously referred to in the literature as adamantinoma, suprasellar cyst and hypophysial duct or Rathke's pouch tumor.

Embryologically, in the development of the hypophysis cell rests or remnants have been found not infrequently to remain along the line of formation and rotation of the gland (Erdheim,1 Carmichael,2 Duffy3 and others). The hypophysis is formed by the union of an upward evagination of the dorsal pharyngeal wall of the primitive oral cavity and a downgrowth from the brain, the infundibulum. Most commonly these cell rests which give rise to cystic tumors have been located in the region between the

×