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August 1940

HUMAN BEHAVIOR AFTER EXTENSIVE BILATERAL REMOVAL FROM THE FRONTAL LOBES

Author Affiliations

Montreal, Canada

From the Montreal Neurological Institute and the Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, McGill University.

Arch NeurPsych. 1940;44(2):421-438. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1940.02280080181011
Abstract

At rare intervals chance presents to a neurosurgeon a lesion of the brain demanding treatment that would satisfy the exacting requirements of an extirpation experiment. This was true of the case we are about to record. Psychologic studies of the patient were made before, during and after an extensive bilateral frontal lobectomy, without yielding evidence of postoperative deterioration such as might have been expected from earlier examinations, and particularly from the case studied in detail by Brickner.1 It becomes evident that human behavior and mental activity may be more greatly impaired by the positive action of an abnormal area of brain than by the negative effect of its complete absence,2 and the case reported here presents a new opportunity for study of the functions of the frontal lobes.

REPORT OF A CASE 

History.  —K. M., a man aged 27, who was right handed, came to the clinic in

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