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January 1941

STUDIES IN DISEASES OF MUSCLEIX. EFFECT OF QUININE AND PROSTIGMINE METHYL SULFATE ON MUSCULAR RIGIDITY IN PARALYSIS AGITANS

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the New York Hospital; the Departments of Medicine and Pharmacology, Cornell University Medical College, and the Russell Sage Institute of Pathology.

Arch NeurPsych. 1941;45(1):74-85. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1941.02280130084005
Abstract

Both prostigmine methyl sulfate and quinine are known to influence the effects of stimulation of cholinergic nerves. Prostigmine methyl sulfate increases these effects, and has actions that closely resemble those of physostigmine. It depresses the activity of choline esterase (McGeorge1), antagonizes the effects of curare (Briscoe2), and has effects on various organs that are similar to those produced by cholinergic nerve stimulation (Aeschlimann and Reinert3). On the other hand, quinine reduces the effects of cholinergic nerve stimulation on striated muscle (Harvey4) and the salivary glands (Stavraky5) and decreases the effects of acetylbetamethylcholine (Starr6) and of vagal stimulation on the heart (Lewis, Drury, Iliescu and Wedd7 and Nathanson8).

Recently, both drugs have found a useful place in the management of patients with certain muscular disorders. In myasthenia gravis, muscular weakness and fatigability often are improved promptly, although only temporarily, by the administration of

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