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February 1941

EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES ON HEADACHEA. CONTRAST OF HISTAMINE HEADACHE WITH THE HEADACHE OF MIGRAINE AND THAT ASSOCIATED WITH HYPERTENSION B. CONTRAST OF VASCULAR MECHANISMS IN PREHEADACHE AND IN HEADACHE PHENOMENA OF MIGRAINE

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the New York Hospital and Departments of Medicine and Psychiatry, Cornell University Medical College.

Arch NeurPsych. 1941;45(2):199-214. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1941.02280140009001
Abstract

There is evidence that stretched cranial arteries give rise to certain headaches.1 Evidence has also been presented to show that the cerebral arteries, principally the large arteries at the base of the brain, are responsible for the quality and intensity of the headache which follows intravenous injection of histamine and that the extracerebral arteries make only a minor contribution to the histamine headache.2 The headaches of migraine and hypertension, on the other hand, result largely from the stretch and dilatation of arteries in the scalp and dura.3 Experiments briefly alluded to in previous communications, but not reported in detail (the effect of increased intracranial pressure on histamine headache), form in part the basis for these inferences. These experiments are presented fully in the present report.

The experiments herein described have as their aim, first, the further analysis of the vascular mechanisms underlying migraine headache and headache associated

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