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February 1941

TUMORS OF THE BRAIN IN AGED PERSONS

Author Affiliations

ROCHESTER, MINN.

From the Section on Neurology (Dr. Moersch), the Section on Neurosurgery (Dr. Craig) and the Section on Neuropathology (Dr. Kernohan), of the Mayo Clinic.

Arch NeurPsych. 1941;45(2):235-245. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1941.02280140045004
Abstract

Tumors of the brain have no respect for age; their type may vary with the various periods of life, but old age is no guarantee against their appearance. As the result of improved diagnostic methods, which include ophthalmoscopic, perimetric, roentgenographic, encephalographic, ventriculographic and, more recently, electroencephalographic examinations, physicians may have to modify the concept that tumors of the brain in aged persons are relatively rare. It is true that the cardinal signs of tumor of the brain are essentially the same in all periods of life, although in the aged patient they may be so modified that their significance escapes detection. Frequently, the natural penalties of advancing years will mask the early signs of a tumor and lead the physician to an incorrect evaluation of the symptoms unless he is cognizant of the frequency with which tumors of the brain occur in aged persons. Hastings1 has aptly stated:

The

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