[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Other
February 1941

INFARCTION OF THE BRAIN WITH UNILATERAL CIRCULATORY CHANGES

Author Affiliations

Nashville, Tenn.

From the Department of Surgery, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine.

Arch NeurPsych. 1941;45(2):321-329. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1941.02280140131014
Abstract

Recently, 2 striking cases of extreme unilateral vasomotor disturbance associated with cerebral lesions have been reported. In the first, reported by Bucy,1 there developed sudden right hemiplegia and hemianesthesia and aphasia, with absence of the radial pulse and unobtainable blood pressure in the right arm, thirteen days after a mild injury to the head. The right radial pulse first became palpable four hours after the cerebral accident. The blood pressure was first definitely obtained on the right side four days later and remained lower than that on the left for two additional days. The skin was "colder" on the right side for three days after the cerebral accident. All neurologic symptoms rapidly disappeared, and recovery was complete.

The second case was reported by Kerr and Underwood.2 After acute right hemiplegia with motor aphasia ten years prior to examination, there developed coldness of the right extremities, variable weakness or

×