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March 1941

HISTOLOGIC EVIDENCE OF DAMAGE TO THE BRAIN IN MONKEYS TREATED WITH METRAZOL AND INSULIN

Author Affiliations

BOSTON

From the Department of Nervous and Mental Diseases, Harvard Medical School and the Boston Psychopathic Hospital.

Arch NeurPsych. 1941;45(3):403-438. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1941.02280150011001
Abstract

In 1937, having had occasion to observe psychotic patients being treated with insulin and metrazol, we were impressed by the signs of shock and damage to the central nervous system incident to such treatment. The great majority of the patients showed signs of involvement of the pyramidal tracts during the insulin coma or the metrazol seizure, and these signs occasionally remained even after consciousness had completely returned. In addition, various other persistent, and apparently permanent, abnormal neurologic signs were observed, such as absence of the knee jerk, ptosis, strabismus and loss of pupillary accommodation to near objects.

As a result of these observations we undertook to determine what damage to the central nervous system might be produced by similarly administering insulin and metrazol to monkeys.

METHODS AND MATERIAL  The studies were limited to adult Macacus rhesus monkeys, of which three groups were used.

Group 1.  —Normal Control Animals: Complete serial

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