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June 1941

ENCEPHALOPATHY DUE TO BURNSREPORT OF A CASE

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Psychiatric Division of Bellevue Hospital, and the Department of Psychiatry, New York University College of Medicine.

Arch NeurPsych. 1941;45(6):980-983. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1941.02280180092006
Abstract

Since a severe burn constitutes a serious trauma, attended by severe shock and offering a genuine threat to life, it is to be expected that it will leave a deep impress on the psyche of the victim, which will subsequently be reflected in his behavior. Apart from the more subtle psychologic effects, however, there is evidence that, on occasion, a burn may be the etiologic agent in the production of lesions of the central nervous system. Kruse1 reported the case of a 14 month old child in which an extensive, second degree burn was followed by blindness, progressive hydrocephalus and mental deterioration; there was subsequent recovery from the blindness. Globus and Bender2 reported a case of disseminated toxic-degenerative encephalopathy (disseminated sclerosing demyelination) secondary to extensive and severe burns in an 8 year old boy. This paper adds another to the short series of reported cases in which neurologic

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