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July 1941

MULTIPLE PRIMARY TUMORS OF THE SPINAL CORD

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO

From the Department of Neurology and Neurological Surgery, University of Illinois College of Medicine.

Arch NeurPsych. 1941;46(1):59-71. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1941.02280190069005
Abstract

Multiple primary tumors of the spinal cord and its meninges are rare and, like those of the brain, are most frequently found accidentally at necropsy. In most instances the largest of the tumors produces the predominant symptoms, which mask those produced by the smaller new growths. In other cases the multiple growths may be asymptomatic, or the clinical picture may be that of a disseminated lesion of the spinal cord similar to that produced by multiple sclerosis or diffuse adhesive spinal arachnoiditis. In a study of 100 cases of glioma of the spinal cord by Foerster and Bailey1 only 2 cases of multiple tumors were encountered, and in only 1 of Elsberg's2 series of 81 cases of tumor of the spinal cord were multiple growths observed. Because of the infrequency of reports in the literature on multiple tumors of the spinal cord, a study of 2 cases and

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