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January 1942

VASCULAR PATTERN OF LESIONS OF MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS

Author Affiliations

PORTLAND, ORE.

From the Institut Bunge, Antwerp, Belgium, and the Department of Anatomy, University of Oregon Medical School, Portland, Ore.

Arch NeurPsych. 1942;47(1):1-18. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1942.02290010011001
Abstract

The theory of a relation between the cerebrovascular system and the lesions of multiple sclerosis has been advanced by many workers. The first of many to assign a primary role to vascular lesions was Rindfleisch.1 Ribbert2 early maintained that the demyelinated areas were related to a primary disseminated thrombosis. He described a congested central vessel in all the sclerotic patches. In two small patches cut in serial section he found white blood cells in the lumen of the vessel, partly adherent to the vessel wall and partly filling the vessel as an embolus. He stated that these changes in the vessel were multiple thrombi and expressed the belief that they had an important causative role in multiple sclerosis. The most recent adherents to the idea that vascular lesions play a primary role in the pathogenesis of the lesions of multiple sclerosis have been Putnam and his collaborators.3

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