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March 1942

ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHIC EFFECTS OF ACUTE INCREASES OF INTRACRANIAL PRESSURE

Author Affiliations

NEW HAVEN, CONN.

From the Laboratory of Physiology, Yale University School of Medicine.

Arch NeurPsych. 1942;47(3):449-453. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1942.02290030107009
Abstract

During the past decade the examination of the electrical activity of the cerebral cortex has become of value in clinical neurology. Various studies have shown that a pathologic condition is usually indicated by the presence of slow waves of increased amplitude in the electroencephalogram. Berger1 stated that these slow waves were entirely due to increased intracranial pressure. Walter2 observed that there was no correlation between the intracranial pressure and the character of the electroencephalogram. Williams3 made a further analysis of the problem and concluded that changes in the electrical activity of patients with increased intracranial pressure were due primarily to intracellular hydration of the white matter and not to the raised pressure per se. Hoagland and his collaborators,4 studying the problem in dogs, found no change in the electrical activity when the intracranial pressure was increased to approximately 25 mm. of mercury.

The present experiments were

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