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April 1942

WESTERN VARIETY OF EQUINE ENCEPHALITIS IN MANA CLINICOPATHOLOGIC STUDY

Author Affiliations

MINNEAPOLIS

From the Division of Nervous and Mental Diseases, University of Minnesota Medical School.

Arch NeurPsych. 1942;47(4):565-587. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1942.02290040055003
Abstract

Equine encephalitis is not a new disease; it has been observed in the United States for over ninety years. Its etiology was not definitely established until 1931, when Meyer and his co-workers1 first reported the discovery of a virus as the cause of encephalomyelitis among horses and mules in the San Joaquin Valley of California. A few years later TenBroeck and Merrill2 isolated a virus in an epizootic occurring in the eastern states. This virus proved to be immunologically distinct from the western strain isolated by Meyer. It produced a much more virulent infection, with a resultant mortality of almost 90 per cent (Feemster3).

Meyer4 in 1932 first suggested that human beings might become infected with the equine virus and reported 3 cases in which he suspected such an infection. Eklund and Blumstein5 presented the first proof that such a specific human infection might actually

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