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May 1942

THE BRAIN IN SICKLE CELL ANEMIA

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Department of Pathology and the Mental Hygiene Clinic, Queens General Hospital.

Arch NeurPsych. 1942;47(5):752-767. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1942.02290050054004
Abstract

The central nervous system has not been examined with specific neuropathologic methods in any series of cases of sickle cell anemia. The present study is based on such a series of 5 unselected cases. Diagnostically questionable cases were ruled out. In all 5 cases lesions were present in the central nervous system.

The neuropathologic changes showed a great similarity in all cases, indicating a characteristic neuropathologic picture of sickle cell anemia.

REPORT OF CASES 

Case 1.  —A Negress aged 28 had a history of migratory polyarthritis for five years. The patient was described as mentally peculiar, with a history of possible psychotic episodes and two suicidal attempts. She had once been to a medical clinic complaining of frequent "bleeding from below." Five days before admission an infection of the upper respiratory tract, with cough, chills and fever, developed. On the day of admission she was semistuporous and disoriented and complained

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