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May 1942

INTRACRANIAL BLOOD FLOW IN DEMENTIA PARALYTICA, CEREBRAL ATROPHY AND SCHIZOPHRENIA

Author Affiliations

CINCINNATI

From the Departments of Psychiatry, Neurology and Internal Medicine, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, and the Cincinnati General Hospital.

Arch NeurPsych. 1942;47(5):793-799. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1942.02290050095007
Abstract

Recently an objective method for measuring a function of total intracranial blood flow has been developed,1 which seems suitable for comparing the blood flow of groups of subjects. The following report is a comparative study of the total intracranial blood flow, as determined by this method, of patients suffering from dementia paralytica, from nonsyphilitic cortical atrophy and from schizophrenia. A group of 18 patients in the hospital who exhibited no clinical evidence of abnormal circulation in the brain or elsewhere served as controls.

METHOD  The method has been described in detail.1 The relative intracranial blood flow was estimated by measuring the rate of cerebrospinal fluid displacement through a large lumbar puncture needle during sudden temporary compression of the veins of the neck. The studies were carried out with the cerebrospinal fluid pressure adjusted to 200 mm. of fluid. The veins were compressed by inflation of a freely distensible

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