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June 1942

PATHOLOGIC CHANGES IN THE CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM IN EXPERIMENTAL ELECTRIC SHOCK

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO

From the Elgin and Manteno State Hospitals and the Institute of Neurology, Northwestern University Medical School.

Arch NeurPsych. 1942;47(6):918-930. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1942.02290060056003
Abstract

The introduction by Cerletti and Bini1 of the electric shock as a method of treatment of functional psychoses again raises the question as to the effect of the electric current on nerve tissue. The literature on this subject is concerned both with the lethal effect of high tension currents on man (Hassin2) and with the nonlethal effect of electric shock in animal experiments. There are two publications which should be reviewed in connection with the latter, the one by Morrison, Weeks and Cobb3 and the other by MacMahon.4 The first authors were interested mainly in the histopathologic changes in the brain of rabbits, guinea pigs and cats following electric shock of ten seconds' duration, which was produced in four different ways: (1) with an induction coil, (2) with condenser discharge, (3) with alternating current and (4) with direct current. The outstanding histopathologic feature in all four

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