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June 1942

FATAL INFECTIOUS POLYNEURITIS IN CHILDHOODINFECTIOUS NEURONITIS, ACUTE POLYNEURITIS WITH FACIAL DIPLEGIA, GUILLAIN-BARRÉ SYNDROME AND LANDRY'S PARALYSIS

Author Affiliations

CINCINNATI

From the Laboratory of Neuropathology of the Cincinnati General Hospital and the Children's Hospital Research Foundation, and the Departments of Internal Medicine (Neurology) and Pediatrics of the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine.

Arch NeurPsych. 1942;47(6):938-942. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1942.02290060076005
Abstract

Infectious polyneuritis is thought rarely to be fatal in childhood. The usually favorable prognosis of the condition in children has contributed to the impression that the disease is innocuous in the adult as well. That this is not the case is attested to by mortality percentages in adults of from 14 to 42, in series which were studied carefully.1

This report is concerned with an instance in which infectious polyneuritis proved to be rapidly fatal in a child. Thorough anatomic and animal inoculation studies were made.

REPORT OF A CASE  A 4½ year old white boy was admitted to the Children's Hospital, Cincinnati, on Nov. 5, 1940. The child had been well except for an attack of whooping cough at the age of 2 years. He had had frequent colds. On October 26 a cold developed which lasted four or five days. On November 1 he complained of pain

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