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November 1942

TOXOPLASMIC ENCEPHALOMYELITISVI. CLINICAL DIAGNOSIS OF INFANTILE OR CONGENITAL TOXOPLASMOSIS; SURVIVAL BEYOND INFANCY

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Departments of Neurology and Pathology, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons; the Neurological Institute, and the Babies Hospital.

Arch NeurPsych. 1942;48(5):689-739. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1942.02290110009001
Abstract

Cases of infantile toxoplasmic encephalomyelitis, an infection of the central nervous system due to the protozoon Toxoplasma, have thus far been recognized only by postmortem study1 and animal inoculation with infected tissues obtained at autopsy.2 Consideration of some of the outstanding pathologic features of the disease and a review of the clinical findings in cases verified by autopsy have suggested certain diagnostic criteria for the recognition of the disease during life.1 The outstanding clinical features are the appearance of symptoms and signs of widespread involvement of the central nervous system, often marked by internal hydrocephalus and convulsions at birth, or soon thereafter; roentgenographic evidence of cerebral calcification, and characteristic focal chorioretinitis. Since the description of the pathologic material, 6 living patients have been encountered who show some or all of the features of the syndrome so outlined. From some of these infants and children, toxoplasmas have been isolated, and for these

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