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February 1943

STATISTICAL CONTROL STUDIES IN NEUROLOGYI. THE BABINSKI SIGN

Arch NeurPsych. 1943;49(2):272-276. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1943.02290140132012
Abstract

We became interested in control studies in neurology while investigating the significance of objective signs in cases of head injury. It is evident that as a result of the medicolegal importance of many of these problems a great deal of emphasis is usually placed on objective signs. More weight is usually placed on a Babinski sign or an ocular muscle palsy than on the most intense subjective distress. We often wondered how many of these positive neurologic signs existed before the accident. The subject of the frequency of these signs in people who were not injured began to attract our attention. Considering the great number of injuries in large industrial organizations, it would be important to know the incidence of positive neurologic signs in control groups. Control groups do not necessarily imply normal people. In this study control groups refer to persons not under observation or treatment for head injuries

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