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April 1943

CALCIFICATION OF THE CEREBRAL CORTEX ASSOCIATED WITH A MENINGOTHELIOMATOUS MENINGIOMAPATHOLOGIC STUDY, WITH COMMENT ON INCOMPLETE TYPES OF THE NEUROCUTANEOUS SYNDROME

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO

From the Illinois Neuropsychiatric Institute; the Department of Neurology and Neurological Surgery, University of Illinois College of Medicine, and the Chicago State Hospital.

Arch NeurPsych. 1943;49(4):507-517. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1943.02290160029002
Abstract

Intracranial calcification is not rare, and it is associated with a variety of "physiologic" and pathologic conditions. Calcification of the pineal body or of the falx cerebri occurs with such frequency that the alteration is considered physiologic by many observers. The deposition of calcareous concretions in the region of the basal ganglia has recently been reviewed extensively by Eaton, Camp and Love.1 Their report that the calcification occurs in and about the finer cerebral blood vessels coincides with our observations in cases of a similar condition. This study, on the other hand, pertains to calcification of the brain parenchyma itself, particularly the cortex. Calcification of the cortex of the brain takes place in a variety of pathologic states, the most common being tuberous sclerosis, in which the alterations may be noted within some of the tuberosclerotic nodules. According to Yakovlev and Corwin,2 the calcification in such lesions tends

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