[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Other
June 1943

PERMANENT DAMAGE TO THE NERVOUS SYSTEM FOLLOWING AN ATTACK OF POLYRADICULONEURITIS (GUILLAIN-BARRÉ SYNDROME)Report of a Case, with Necropsy

Author Affiliations

St. Louis

From the Department of Pathology, Washington University School of Medicine, and the St. Louis County Hospital.

Arch NeurPsych. 1943;49(6):895-903. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1943.02290180119012
Abstract

Polyradiculoneuritis is a well recognized neurologic syndrome characterized by widespread motor and sensory signs pointing to involvement of the spinal and cranial nerves (most commonly the seventh cranial nerve). The definitely increased protein content of the cerebrospinal fluid without any change in the number of cells (albuminocytologic dissociation) is regarded as characteristic of the disorder and an important diagnostic feature. On the basis of the clinical symptoms the disease appears to be a distinct entity, but no etiologic agent has been established. That a virus is the causative agent has been repeatedly suspected, and an early report1 described transmission of the disease to monkeys. All subsequent work, however, has failed to substantiate this earlier claim, although the idea that the syndrome is an acute infectious disease generally prevails.2

Clinically, polyradiculoneuritis is characterized by the onset of progressively severe neurologic signs and symptoms, which may continue to a fatal

×