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October 1943

PREVENTION OF HEMORRHAGES IN THE BRAIN IN EXPERIMENTAL ELECTRIC SHOCK

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO

From the Chicago State Hospital.

Arch NeurPsych. 1943;50(4):450-455. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1943.02290220080006
Abstract

The occurrence of hemorrhages in the central nervous system of experimental animals following electrically induced convulsions1 gained additional practical significance from the reports by Levy2 and Alpers and Hughes3 of similar hemorrhages in the human brain. A search for appropriate preventive measures to forestall the appearance of such lesions therefore appeared obligatory.

EXPERIMENTS  Experiments on rats had three preparatory aims, attention being focused, first, on the blood itself; second, on the dynamics of the cardiovascular system, and, third, on the utilization of ether narcosis as an anticonvulsant agent.1. Of the total number of 35 adult albino rats, 14 were selected for preparatory treatment with synthetic vitamin K, a thromboplastic suspension of brain substance and calcium gluconate.4 One milligram of synthetic vitamin K per 200 Gm. of rat was injected into 2 animals eight hours prior to each electric treatment. Calcium gluconate, in a dose equivalent

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