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April 1944

TREMOR AND THE BABINSKI SIGN IN ALCOHOLIC PATIENTSINCIDENCE AND INTERPRETATION

Author Affiliations

BOSTON

From the Boston Psychopathic Hospital and the Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School.

Arch NeurPsych. 1944;51(4):403-404. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1944.02290280101007

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Abstract

Alterations of cerebral function in alcoholic patients are evidenced by confusion, disordered speech and convulsions. In spite of these manifestations of cerebral dysfunction, tremor is not always present, and the Babinski sign is rare. To determine the incidence of tremor and the Babinski sign in alcoholic psychoses, we carefully examined 200 patients, all of whom were addicted to prolonged and excessive use of alcohol in various forms.

MATERIAL AND OBSERVATIONS  The material consisted of 200 adults, ranging in age from 21 to 65, with histories of various degrees of alcoholism, who were admitted to the Boston Psychopathic Hospital between November 1940 and June 1943 for alcoholism. In tests for the Babinski sign, the criteria employed were essentially those laid down by Babinski in Semaine médicale. The patient was well relaxed, with the eyes closed, the legs extended and the feet resting on the bed near its outer edge, or with

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