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August 1944

EFFECT OF INSULIN HYPOGLYCEMIA ON GLYCOGEN CONTENT OF PARTS OF THE CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM OF THE DOG

Author Affiliations

ALBANY, N. Y.

From the Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Albany Medical College, Union University.

Arch NeurPsych. 1944;52(2):114-116. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1944.02290320029003
Abstract

In a previous study1 we determined the glycogen contents of the various parts of the central nervous system in dogs and cats with normal levels of the blood sugar. It was found that each portion of the central nervous system possessed a characteristic concentration of glycogen and that in general, in the adult, these concentrations followed a definite order, being lowest in the cord and becoming increasingly greater in the successive rostral portions. Kerr and associates,2 who studied only the cerebral cortex, observed that its glycogen content was remarkably constant under all conditions except for hypoglycemia. With an average normal value of 90 mg. per hundred grams of cortex, they found that a fall of 50 mg. or less per hundred grams resulted in the production of hypoglycemic symptoms. The lowest values they observed in the cerebral cortex averaged approximately 30 mg. per hundred grams of tissue. In

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