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November 1944

STUDIES IN REFLEXESHISTORY, PHYSIOLOGY, SYNTHESIS AND NOMENCLATURE: STUDY II

Author Affiliations

SAN FRANCISCO

From the Department of Neurology, Division of Medicine, University of California Medical School.

Arch NeurPsych. 1944;52(5):341-358. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1944.02290350002001
Abstract

BRACHIORADIAL REFLEX  This is the most important reflex of the upper extremity. Of particular significance, especially in diagnosis of a transverse lesion in the cervical part of the spinal cord, is the comparative strength of the brachioradial and triceps reflexes. The importance of this point can hardly be overestimated. The brachioradial reflex is elicited by a brisk stretching of the brachioradial muscle, formerly called the supinator Iongus muscle. Monrad-Krohn161 described it under the heading "radialis periosteal reflex (supinator jerk)." This reflex is also often called the radius reflex, the forearm periosteal reflex, the radioperiosteal reflex, the supination reflex, the wrist jerk, the forearm reflex, the styloradial reflex, the radioflexor reflex, the radiobicipital reflex and the reflex of the head of the radius. It is hardly necessary to dwell on the technic of its elicitation. This is true of practically any other reflex. If the topography and function of the

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