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January 1945

PHENOMENON OF VISUAL EXTINCTION IN HOMONYMOUS FIELDS AND PSYCHOLOGIC PRINCIPLES INVOLVED

Author Affiliations

U.S.N.R.; U.S.N.R.

From the United States Naval Hospital, San Diego, Calif.

Arch NeurPsych. 1945;53(1):29-33. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1945.02300010039002
Abstract

During World War I a variety of syndromes due to cerebral injuries were described. Among the numerous interesting signs noted was one of "visual inattention in homonymous fields," or "hemianopsic weakness of attention." Poppelreuter1 observed 7 cases in which the patient was able to perceive only one of two figures or points simultaneously exposed on the sides of a central point of fixation. However, if only one figure was exposed in the "affected field," the image was seen. Head2 noted this phenomenon in a case of a gunshot wound of the left occipito-parietal cortex, with residual aphasia and a right homonymous field defect, but his description lacks details. Riddoch3 reported 2 cases of defective attention in the right homonymous fields, and in both instances there was a neoplasm in the angular and supramarginal gyri on the left side. Akelaitis4 described 2 cases of left and 1

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