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February 1945

HYPERTHERMIA FOLLOWING INJURY OF THE PREOPTIC REGIONREPORT OF A CASE

Author Affiliations

MEDICAL CORPS, ARMY OF THE UNITED STATES

Arch NeurPsych. 1945;53(2):150-151. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1945.02300020062008
Abstract

Acute cerebrogenic hyperthermia has long been recognized as an entity of neurosurgical importance (Cushing,1 Gagel,2 Dott,3 Erickson,4 Davison5 and Zimmerman6). Clinical accounts have indicated that this type of high, and often fatal, fever is caused by injury of the hypothalamus or of nearby parts of the brain, a general conclusion in accord with the results of recent animal experimentation. However, in most instances of neurogenic hyperthermia in man the cerebral damage has been diffuse, and localization of the responsible region has not been as precise as that achieved by special technics in animals. The most discrete lesions described in the literature are those presented by Alpers.7

The following case is thought worthy of record because the injury of the brain that was believed to have destroyed central mechanisms for heat loss and thus have resulted in the extreme elevation of body temperature was

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