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March 1945

VISUAL DISTURBANCES PRODUCED BY BILATERAL LESIONS OF THE OCCIPITAL LOBES WITH CENTRAL SCOTOMAS

Author Affiliations

U.S.N.R.; U.S.N.R.

From the United States Naval Hospital, San Diego, Calif.

Arch NeurPsych. 1945;53(3):165-170. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1945.02300030002001
Abstract

Experience in the last war has shown that injuries to both occipital lobes result in total blindness. The blindness, however, is rarely permanent.1 As a rule, there is progressive restitution of vision although recovery is seldom complete. In many cases careful perimetric examination may reveal residual scotomas in the homonymous fields of vision. The degree of partial blindness depends on the extent of the damage to the calcarine cortex. In addition to field defects, certain physiologic and psychologic mechanisms of vision may become apparent in these cases through special examinations. Interesting descriptions of qualitative and quantitative changes in restitution of visual function may also be volunteered by the patient. Recently, we had the opportunity to study several persons with battle wounds of both occipital lobes. One of the patients presented a remarkable clinical picture throughout the period of recovery, and his case is herewith described in detail.2

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